Understanding What Type of Residential Home Your Loved One Needs

Have you been told that your loved one requires a particular type of care home...but are unsure of what it means?

We have created this article to help you understand the type of care that your loved one needs.

Residential Home Types

Residential Care Home

Features:

  • 24 hour care
  • Registered Manager
  • Visiting healthcare proffessionals
  • Events & entertainment
  • Resident rooms
  • En-suite or shared bathrooms
  • Shared living & dining areas
  • Meals

Care types supported:

  • Elderly - Over 65 years of age, typically older
  • Frailty - Defined as ‘the condition of being weak & delicate’. Often when an individual is referred to as ‘frail’ there are concerns about their ability to carry out day-to-day tasks independently e.g. personal care, shopping, meal preparation and so forth.
  • Mobility - Elderly people experience a decline in muscle mass, which can affect their ability to mobilise independently. It is common for an elderly person to walk with a stick, walker, frame for additional support and or a wheelchair to travel longer distances.
  • Degenerative healthcare conditions - Degeneration refers to the process by which tissues deteriorate and lose their ability to function, it is part and parcel of growing older.  Elderly people often grow frail due to the degeneration process that occurs in their bodies. Hearing & sight loss are common degenerative conditions.

Care types that might be supported:

  • Hoisting - Some residential care homes are able to support residents who require hoisting, whereas others may deem this a nursing care need. Hoisting in itself is not a nursing need, however residents will be at higher risk of developing bedsores/ulcers which require the care of a registered Nurse.
  • Wound dressing - Most wounds will require the care of a Nurse for dressing, depending on the frequency of dressings some residential homes may be happy to work with the District Nursing team to meet this care requirement.
  • Diabetes managed with insulin - Insulin injections will need to be administered by a Nurse, again, a residential home may be happy to meet this requirement by arranging regular visits from the District Nursing team.

Residential Dementia Care Home

A residential dementia care home has the same features as a residential care home, but will have adaptions to make the home more comfortable for those living with dementia. For instance, they may have signs on the walls and will definitely have staff who are trained in caring for people who have dementia.

Some residential care homes are specifically designed to support people with specialist dementia care. If somebody presents challenging behaviour with their dementia e.g. wandering, verbal/physical aggression you should confirm with the care home whether they can support.

In some instances, despite having vacancies, a home that supports residents who present challenging behaviour will decline a prospective resident if their behaviour will negatively impact on the care needs of existing residents.

Nursing Home

Features:

  • 24 hour care
  • Registered Manager
  • Visiting healthcare proffessionals
  • Events & entertainment
  • Registered Nurse onsite 24 hours a day
  • Resident rooms
  • En-suite or shared bathrooms
  • Shared living & dining areas
  • Meals

Care types supported:

  • Elderly - Over 65 years of age, typically older
  • Hoisting - All nursing homes should be able to support individuals who require full or partial hoisting. Some residents may be able to sit-up in a chair if hoisted, whereas others may be bed bound but require hoisting for personal care.
  • Intravenous Medication -  Individuals who require regular injections or intravenous medication to be administered can be supported within a nursing home. This includes insulin injections to manage diabetes and any medication administered via a cannula e.g. morphine for pain management.
  • Wounds -  Nurses should be able to support individuals with open wounds that require dressing e.g. ulcers. The Nurses at the home will work with various healthcare professionals regarding an individual’s wound-care treatment, but they will be responsible for the delivery of the treatment plan.
  • Cancer Care - Cancer care can be supported within a nursing home, support will be provided to the nursing home by specialist healthcare professionals e.g. Macmillan Nurses.
  • Terminal/Palliative Care - All nursing homes should be able to support individuals with end-of-life care, again they will work with various healthcare professionals to ensure residents remain comfortable during the end stages of their life.
  • Peg-feeding - Somebody who is peg-fed has a feeding tube directly into their stomach through their abdominal wall. This allows for nutrition, fluids & or medication to be put directly into the stomach. If an individual is peg-fed they will likely be nil by mouth due to swallowing problems.
  • Complex Care Needs - Complex care needs includes many of the care types mentioned above, to be ‘complex’ it requires the ongoing care of nursing staff.  An individual who has had a stroke & lost the use of all limbs, speech & the ability to swallow would be considered as having complex care needs.

Care types that might be supported:

  • Younger Adults - Depending on a nursing home’s registration they may be able to support younger adults e.g. under the age of 65, with nursing care needs. Depending on the average age of existing residents, it may be inappropriate for a nursing home to offer support to a ‘younger adult’ even if their registration allows them to.

Nursing Dementia Home

A nursing dementia home has all of the features of a regular nursing home, but will often have a secure ‘nursing dementia’ wing in the home. Staff members will have received training in dementia care.

Some nursing homes advise that they are only able to support individuals with dementia if their nursing needs outweigh their dementia needs.

Younger Adults Home

Younger Adult Definition - Anybody under the age of 65 is considered a younger adult.

Depending on a care/nursing home’s registration with the Care Quality Commission (CQC), they may have to apply for a special waiver to support any residents under the age of 65. If a care/nursing home predominantly has elderly residents, they often decline residents under the age of 65 based on the living environment not being age-appropriate.

There are some care home’s which are specifically for younger adults, currently these are few and far between. There is an increasing demand for residential/nursing homes to offer support to younger adults with dementia. It is expected that the care sector will respond to this demand by opening homes specifically for younger adults with dementia.

Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) Home

ABI Definition - Brain damage caused by events after birth, rather than as part of a genetic or congenital disorder.

For individuals who have an ABI which no longer requires intensive rehabilitation but has resulted in them being unable to live independently, they will likely need support from a specialist ABI home.

Care/nursing homes which support people with ABI’s will have specialist staff who are trained in supporting people with ABI’s. A large part of the after-care for somebody with an ABI is ongoing rehabilitation.

Types of ABI’s:

  • Traumatic Brain Injury e.g. car crash
  • Brain aneurysm (swelling/bleed)
  • Hydrocephalus (build up of spinal fluid on the brain, increases pressure and lead to brain damage)
  • Stroke
  • Brain tumour
  • Meningitis (bacterial infection which can lead to brain damage)

If you would like help with finding any of the care home types above, please do contact our specialist Care Adviser Team today.

Give us a call, message or live chat for free help with your search for care!

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